The Importance of the Client Consultation

The Importance of the Client Consultation

Published by Andrea Taylor on 23rd Jan 2020

Client Consultation 

It is crucial to give a new client consultation extra attention to avoid misunderstandings. Not only will it save you time and money because you won’t have to redo the service, but it will also set the tone for future business. A client who leaves the salon fully satisfied with their experience is the best possible advertisement for you and the salon – the client will tell family and friends about their experience, and new business is certain. You need to build the client’s trust and understanding to ensure that the consultation is successful. This way, you will both have the same ideas and vision for the final result.

Why do a client consultation?

A client consultation helps you establish trust with your client as you discuss the goals he/she as for her tan. A consultation gives you an opportunity to gather information from your client, which is essential in designing a style and recommending the right products. It helps you identify any contra-indications, allergies, medical conditions or potential issues that may affect the result of the treatment.

Consent

Under 18 above 16 years minor - If a client is under 18 years of age - a parent/ guardian needs to attend the client consultation, sign a consent form and be present in the room when spraying for first time. On consecutive sprays the parent/guardian, can simply book in the minor and consent via return email to the booking. (A reply email is great to keep on file!) The spray tanner will also require a current Working With Children Check.

Under 16 years of age. - If a client is under 16 years of age - a parent/ guardian needs to attend the client consultation, sign a consent form and be present in the room when spraying for first time. Consecutive sprays need to have an authorised adult present at the consent of the parent/ guardian they must sign the consent form with each spray.

Contra-indications

Contra- indications are a condition which makes a particular treatment or procedure potentially inadvisable. A contraindication may be absolute or relative. An absolute contraindication is a situation which makes a particular treatment or procedure absolutely inadvisable.

Does your client have any active skin conditions? These may include but not be limited to open wounds or lesions, sunburn, active psoriasis or eczema. These conditions should not be sprayed but referred to a GP. Some clients can be sprayed for minor skin conditions however there must not be any broken skin and these areas must be avoided. Talk to your client about a suitable outcome.

Is your client pregnant? In general as there is no data on spray tanning during pregnancy, the general rule of thumb, is to advise against spray tanning until the 16 weeks mark. If the client insists request a doctor's letter or sign a waiver.

Is your client asthmatic? If so, please ensure your space is well ventilated with an extraction system and request your client to bring in their Ventolin or preventer medication. For clients on preventative medication establish an action plan for if they do have a reaction during a spray tan. It is advisable to have a family member/ friend present during the spray - particularly for the first spray.

Does your client have tinea versicolor? Tinea versicolour is a fungal infection of the skin. It's also called pityriasis versicolor and is caused by a type of yeast that naturally lives on your skin. Discoloured patches of skin are the most noticeable symptom of tinea versicolour, and these patches usually show up on the arms, chest, neck, or back. These patches may be: lighter (more common) or darker than the surrounding skin. pink, red, tan, or brown. dry, itchy, and scaly. In some cases affected skin will not take the tan. Anti-dandruff shampoos on the relevant area may improve the skin prior to tan.

Does your client have any intolerances or allergies? Or does anyone they may come into contact with? Many spray tans now contain nut based oils such as argan, macadamia and coconut. It is vital that you establish whether your client has any allergies and also ask if any of their family or friends do too. As there is a risk of transfer which could trigger an allergic reaction. A transfer can occur even after a rinse, so it is important to advise the client of this.

Is your client sensitive in general? For sensitive individuals a patch test could be completed on the inside of the wrist, elbow, behind ear or inside leg (Not as obvious location!)

Contra-actions

A contra-action maybe a tan that doesn't develop or overdevelops. This will be due to the PH of the skin, products used on the skin, a potential barrier on the skin etc: Refer to page 15-20 for further information. Other contra-actions may include skin irritation, shortness of breath, feeling faint, pigmentation disorders, itchy or watery eyes and possibly swelling due to an allergic reaction.

If there is an allergic reaction follow general first aid and remove the irritant from the skin. Have a shower available for use wherever you are. Use cool water only if they are having a reaction and encourage the client to remove all tan from their skin. For sensitive individuals a spray tan solution with a lower level of DHA left on for a shorter period of time.

It is crucial to give a new client consultation extra attention to avoid misunderstandings. Not only will it save you time and money because you won’t have to redo the service, but it will also set the tone for future business. A client who leaves the salon fully satisfied with their experience is the best possible advertisement for you and the salon – the client will tell family and friends about their experience, and new business is certain. You need to build the client’s trust and understanding to ensure that the consultation is successful. This way, you will both have the same ideas and vision for the final result.

Hypo and Hyper Skin Pigmentation

Vitiligo (hypopigmentation), Chloasma (hyperpigmentation)

It is important to note that spray tan DOES NOT affect or change the areas of pigmentation, only on the areas of the skin cells in the stratum cornum.

HYPOPIGMENTATION

This occurs in skin with deficient, or lower than normal,pigmentation or colouring. It can be hormonally related or can happen as a result of the ageing process and can occur in patches. While skin texture is unaffected, it can make the skin look rough and be quite inhibiting for the client. The most common form of hypopigmentation is vitiligo (also known as leucoderma), which is characterised by the formation of smooth, white, circumscribed irregular patches, often with increased pigmentation of the surrounding skin which appears darker because of the contrast against the lighter patches. The white patches burn easily in the sun, as their melanin content is low or nonexistent. Vitiligo occurs chiefly on the hands and in the elderly. Its cause is unknown and it occurs mainly in the tropics. This skin colouring can be evened out by applying self tanners but

you should check with individual manufacturers for their recommendations. The treatment can help to disguise the lighter patches for a special occasion, giving confidence to clients who are psychologically affected by the condition.

HYPERPIGMENTATION

This occurs as the result of excessive pigmentation – above the normal ratio expected for the natural colour of the skin. The most common condition is chloasma, which is the development of smooth irregular-shaped patches of brown pigment. This is usually hormone-related, so may occur in pregnancy or as a result of the increased hormone levels of a client taking the oral contraceptive pill. As the affected skin is already dark, the only way of evening out the skin colour is to apply tan around the dark patches and avoid the area itself, to try and minimise the difference. Applying self tan to the chloasma will only deepen the colour and draw attention to the area.

How to do a client consultation

  1. Provide a quiet and comfortable space for your client.
  2. Give your client the necessary paper work, which includes a consultation form to fill in and provide her with a pen. Sit with her and assist her whenever necessary.
  3. Open a client file where you will record all the treatment you give her in the future and any information she gives you.
  4. Inquire about your client’s lifestyle, schedule, personal style and personal preferences.
    Ask open questions that begin with “how,” “what,” “why,” “where,” “which” and “who” to enable you to learn as much as you can from the client. These open questions allow her to provide more information as she cannot answer with a yes or no.
  5. Question your client on previous treatments to learn what has worked for or against her previously.
  6. Specifically for spray tanning – ask if the client has had a spray tan before, what did they like about it, not like about it, what product was used. If they are regular spray tanners, first time or only a special occasion. If they would like a light tan, natural looking tan or going for the really dark tan. In terms of time are they able to wait 8 hours to shower or would it suit them to shower in 1 or 2 hours.
  7. Ask specific questions about:
    a. Exfoliation – have they exfoliated and with which product? Remember supermarket products can cause the spray tan to go orange due to the sulphates, detergents and lack of pH balancing in the product. Products that have crushed shell and nut are too abrasive on the skin stripping not only the dead skin cells but the amino acids in the acid mantle of the skin. Shea butter in exfoliating products can form a barrier against a tan.
    b. Body Wash – do they use one regularly? Again is it salon quality and pH balancing. Be particularly mindful of body wash products that have a moisturiser in them as it forms a barrier on the skin and the tan may not take as well as it should, or become patchy or wear off quickly.
    c. Moisturiser - again do they use one regularly? Do they use one with DHA that extends the life of the tan? Is it salon quality?
    d. What shampoo and conditioner do they use? – this is important as again sulphates and detergents in shampoo and conditioner can affect the spray tan and the acidity of the skin. Products with silicon in them can form barriers over the skin especially on the shoulder where the shampoo and conditioner wash onto.
    e. Go over a client agreement with the client. Discuss the skin tanning process, if you guarantee your tan – explain the system that the client is required to do. Explain to the client what extends the life of a tan and what does not. Get the client to sign your agreement.

Client assessment

Conduct an assessment of the client. Focus on the legs, knees, elbows to assess skin hydration. Summarise your findings on the client card.

Client treatment card

Note the Date and Time – Note the type of solution used, pre and post spray and any extra treatments – e.g. knees very dry – small amount of barrier cream. French manicure – barrier cream used. Client wanted a very dark tan today. Have discussed wear off as she is very pale, etc. Tan extending purchased. For new clients it’s a good idea to give them a call the following night to make sure they are happy with the results.

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